FAITH IN INDONESIA

FAITH IN INDONESIA
The shape of the world a generation from now will be influenced far more by how we communicate the values of our society to others than by military or diplomatic superiority. William Fulbright, 1964

Wednesday, October 17, 2018

HEARING MORE ABOUT WASHINGTON THAN JAKARTA



MANGLING MEDIA PRIORITIES      
 
        

              
Are there any Australians left ignorant of Judge Brett Kavanagh and his successful scramble for a US Supreme Court seat?  Or research psychologist Dr Christine Blasey Fordhis accuser of a last century teenage grog-and-grope session?

But who knows of Ustadz Haji Ma’ruf Amin, 75, seeking to be a heartbeat from Indonesia’s top job?  Two years ago the Muslim scholar urged on half a million protestors howling for Jakarta governor Basuki  ‘Ahok’ Tjahaja Purnama to be jailed for blasphemy.  He’s a Christian, an ethnic Chinese, and still behind bars.

Amin has the supporting role to present president Joko ‘Jokowi’ Widodo, 57, in his bid for a second five-year term.  If the preacher becomes vice-president and his hard-line policies get a grip, they’ll crush the world’s most populous Islamic nation’s reputation for religious tolerance.

Or for those who like their politics lite and frothy, how about actress Ratna Sarumpaet who falsely accused Jokowi-Amin backers of a bashing, when her bandages were masking elective plastic surgery?  She was yanked off an international flight and faces charges; the case is gripping the world’s third largest democracy.

Both the Washington and Jakarta tales are grand soapies  (sinetron in Indonesia) with lashings of sleaze. The first has been forensically reported  in the Australian media; even the ABC’s standout talk show Q & A spent valuable time on an issue of little importance Down Under.

But apart from Lombok and Central Sulawesi disaster stories, coverage of events next door has been scant.

“The imbalance in reporting by the Australian media on issues about Indonesia are indicative of the ignorance and ambivalence that defines the bi-lateral relationship,” according to Perth-based Indonesia Institute President Ross Taylor

“An accident in Bali resulting in a young and drunk Australian hurt from a fall from a motorbike will attract media attention,” he told Asian Currents. 

“Yet Indonesia’s critical presidential election in 2019 and its transition to a far more conservative Islamic society where minority groups are victimised, hardly gets a mention despite the profound implications for Australia”.

The result of the Indonesian campaign now rumbling towards the April poll could thump our future, knocking trade, defence, security – even holidays.  Among other policies, Amin wants homosexuality and adultery  criminalised, so couples heading to Bali might have to pack their marriage certificates.

Should Jokowi’s rival, disgraced former general Prabowo Subianto, 67, win and turn the Republic back to the dictatorship and kleptocracy of second president Soeharto, the fragile relationship with Australia could collapse.  Subianto was once Soeharto’s son-in-law.

Either way we’ll be affected far more than the inauguration circus of a new judge in the US.
The Indonesian election should be given a great deal of careful attention in Australia, says Professor Tim Lindsey Director of Melbourne University’s Centre for Indonesian Law, Islam and Society.
The young Indonesians who will be voting in April in larger numbers than ever since 1999 have grown up in the post-Reformasi environment of clunky and increasingly illiberal procedural democracy, amid contests over Islamisation and amid the rise of the hardliners,” he said.
While they are savvy and highly connected, maybe even more so than their Australian contemporaries, they are also surprisingly conservative. 
This conservatism, driven by increasing Muslim populist intolerance, has led to a situation where the differences between Jokowi and Prabowo are nowhere near as clear as they were at the 2014 election.
Last year Australian Associated Press closed its Jakarta bureau after 35 years in the country.  While Fairfax and the Murdoch media retain offices their staff are now labelled ‘Southeast Asia Correspondents’ when they were previously ‘Indonesian correspondents’. 
The ABC is an exception, keeping its Jakarta office and covering Indonesian affairs through its Asia Pacific Newsroom in Melbourne. Reuters and other overseas agencies in Indonesia produce copy along with correspondents and contributors; some stories are available here, but few have an Australian perspective.
Getting news out of the US is easy for the Australian media.  There’s an abundance of sources and no translations required.   Much is cut and paste plus metrication and  spelling rejigs.
Australia is moving even further from creating widespread familiarity with Indonesia, according to former diplomat and author Ken Ward who worked  as Senior Indonesia Analyst at the Office of National Assessments.  

“(Donald)Trump's election has resulted in a deplorable reorientation of the Australian media towards US reporting,” he said. “This seems to be a mirroring of the US media's obsession with Trump himself. 

“It is as if everything important to Australia takes place in the US. This is not the result of the effective workings of US soft power or political pressure but of a complete lack of imagination on the part of Australians.”

Going to the fount

Australians frustrated with their media can access a few Indonesian sites on-line.

Indonesia has the most liberal media in Asia, though much is partisan with the major free-to-air TV stations owned by moguls wading deep in politics.  

There are two English language papers.  The Jakarta Posthttp://www.thejakartapost.com/ has some stories behind a paywall.  Founded in 1983 it’s historically linked to the broadsheet Kompas, the Republic’s top selling and most credible daily.  

The Jakarta Globe https://jakartaglobe.id/ started in print in 2008 but is now on-line only. It’s owned by the Lippo Group led by evangelical Christian James Riady.

The prestigious weekly news magazine Tempo is among the best for analysis.  It produces print and web editions in English: http://en.tempo.co/

Metro TV, the most serious commercial network focusing on news and current affairs has some reports in English http://en.metrotvnews.com/#  It’s owned by Surya Paloh who also holds the daily newspaper Media Indonesia.  Paloh chairs the Nasdem (National Democratic) party hostile to Subianto.

TV One http://www.tvonenews.tv/ belongs to the Bakrie conglomerate formerly chaired by Aburizal Bakrie who’s prominent in Golkar. The party now appears to be with Widodo-Amin, though political alliances are often fragile.  He was a minister in the previous administration of sixth president Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono.

For 27 years the government station TVRI was the only channel that Indonesians could watch. It claims to have an English language service http://www.tvri.co.id/post/ENGLISH-NEWS-SERVICE but much is in Indonesian.

The Indonesian news agency Antara (between) https://en.antaranews.com/ has copy in stilted English.  It’s supposed to be a private company but comes under the Ministry of State-Owned Enterprises. Its boss, former The Jakarta Post editor-in-chief Meidyatama (Dimas) Suryodiningrat, was reportedly  hand-picked by President Widodo to run the service.

##

 First published in Asian Currents - 17 October 2018

http://asaa.asn.au/mangling-media-priorities/

Saturday, October 13, 2018

T-SHIRT SLOGANS NO GUIDE TO VOTER STYLE


NOTHING SHEEPISH ABOUT INDONESIAN VOTERS

Instead of shouting shepherds and barking dogs, the smarter Australian abattoirs use ovine instincts to lead lambs to slaughter.

Trained wethers (castrated rams) or goats, move among the innocents, gain their trust and then lead their placid pals on a journey from paddock to plate.

Known as Judas, the betrayers get rewarded with handfuls of extra food and wear collars to ensure they don’t get their throats slit along with their followers.

Some in the commentariat, often from the West, think this country has a flock mentality, suggesting there are irrefutables regarding next year’s Presidential election.  These include claiming voters will trot behind whichever religious leader claims to know how to run a modern nation because they’ve spent their lives studying holy texts.

Which is why much importance has been given to the selection of high-standing cleric Ma’ruf Amin as Joko Widodo’s running mate and shield against abuse from the religious right.  It’s assumed the pious will gather at his side and ensure Mr Widodo gets a second term.

Mr Amin has a strong record as an Islamic scholar; whether he remains hostile to pluralism and social issues like homosexuality is another matter. Voters know what he is not - an economist of international standing capable of helping lead the nation out of the fiscal desert and into pastures new.

Electors are also aware that Subianto Prabowo’s VP pick Sandiaga Uno is a former well-heeled banker with a rich past. But he is no Gus Dur, equipped to offer moral guidance to a nation struggling, like all others, to handle a complex world. 

To imply that citizens will chose on one criteria alone is a slander.

During second President Soeharto’s 32-year autocracy ballots were held to show the world that ‘democracy’ was alive though it was then well dead and thoroughly decomposed.  These staged events were neither free nor fair.

Public servants were expected to vote for Soeharto’s Golkar Party; to ensure all complied, booths were opened in government offices.  Witch hunts followed if voting papers were defaced, or backed a rival.

Those days are history and new generations which know nothing of that charade are flexing their opportunities.  For them Merdeka! (freedom) is not just a yell on 17 August, but the right to choose partner, job, dress, behavior, faith - and leaders they hope are qualified and altruistic.

Aided by better education and the most open media in Asia, they hear the multiple voices bellowing in the marketplace of ideas and then decide for themselves.  They can spot hypocrites wearing religious garb at their court sentencing.  They know who owns the partisan TV stations.

There’s little privacy in Indonesia where petty officials have access to residents’ personal information, including their religion and marriage details.  But the polling booth remains off limits, a sanctuary where faith and state can be separated.

Whatever T-shirt the voter wears, once the curtain is drawn she or he can push a hole through the candidate of their choice and none will know.  Even if the elector tells to keep sweet with family and neighbors, it doesn’t follow that’s the truth.

The suggestion that millions will back Mr Widodo because he has a theologian at his side, or go for Mr Prabowo because he has Mr Uno’s wallet to hand, insults all. It implies Indonesians are not independent, thinking individuals. 

The story of Abdullah Gymnastiar is a sober reminder that people are not blinkered followers of religious leaders.  Better known as Aa Gym the popular TV preacher had a well-rewarded career and millions of admirers.  He seemed untouchable, but in 2006 lust ruled and he took another wife; although allowed under Islam, this didn’t stop the outrage. His support melted like ice in the sun.

Then there’s the case of the 1999 East Timor Referendum when observers confidently stated that the locals were happy with their lot and would vote accordingly. Instead 80 per cent chose separation when soldiers and spies were kept away from voting stations.

The prescient British author George Orwell imagined a future where groupthink ruled. That’s come to pass in China and North Korea, though who knows what the people would decide if cameras and guns were absent.

It’s certainly not this Republic where political debate is so lively it shames all ASEAN member states where despots, the military and royalty rule and suppress.

With seven months to go before the elections there’s ample time for citizens to hear all the competing claims and make up their own minds. 

This country is often tagged by outsiders as an ‘evolving’ or ‘developing’ democracy. Those labels are flawed. Indonesia is well advanced and an example to the world. The electorate has matured.

No democracy is perfect - Britain with Brexit, the US with Donald Trump and Australia with unstable leadership show how the system can get tangled.  

Whatever Indonesia’s difficulties now or ahead, most will judge candidates on their merits. The voters will bleat about their problems, but they are not sheep. 

##
First published in The Jakarta Post, Saturday 13 October)